SUPERHERO POWER I WISH I HAD

SUPERHERO POWER I WISH I HAD

I just returned from a trip to Hawaii. Included with all the things I love about Hawaii was something self-generated that I didn’t love. My ITG (Insane Thought Generator) conspired with my ISG (Insane Story Generator) to create a narrative that I didn’t just attach to—I sunk for my teeth into it! That’s when I thought of a recent conversation where someone asked, “What superhero power would you like to have?” I thought about the question for a moment before answering: “I wish I had the ability to instantly let go.” It wasn’t instant, but I was able to eventually let go - and relish the spirit of aloha - using these three techniques.

Read More >

BE CURIOUS

BE CURIOUS

Curiosity is a great tool to help us come back into the present moment — where we can view a situation from multiple angles and perspectives, putting us in position to make optimal decisions. One of my favorite techniques for coming back into the present moment is to reframe a challenging situation with questions that allow me to observe the situation without attaching to it. When we attach too tightly to a situation we naturally inhibit our curiosity, pushing us to accept the first, and sometimes least optimal, answer. Here are three tips to activate your curiosity — and a fun story about the time I tried to buy a pinball machine at age 10.

Read More >

PUT THE SCORECARD DOWN!

PUT THE SCORECARD DOWN!

What takes you out of the present moment? One distraction that instantly takes me out of the present moment is the scorecard. A scorecard is a “report of indication of the status, condition, or success of something or someone.” It’s also my shortcut way of referring to what happens when I decide the time is right to compare your “status, condition, or success” to my “status, condition, or success.” Here are the three techniques I use to put the scorecard away—and return to a grounded, regulated, “in the flow” state.

Read More >

KEEP COMING BACK

KEEP COMING BACK

A recent phone call reminded me of one of my favorite Nelson Mandela quotes, "It always seems impossible until it's done." We all face the impossible moments -- moments filled with darkness when we think nothing will change and we question our ability to push on. That call reminded me of the encouragement I received to push on, to "keep coming back" and to never give up.

Read More >

HERE'S WHAT I'VE BEEN LISTENING TO

HERE'S WHAT I'VE BEEN LISTENING TO

As we wrap up the year -- and many of us hit the road over the holidays -- I thought I’d share three of my favorite podcasts from 2017. Each podcast connects to the theme of resiliency I’ve highlighted in recent blogs. Each inspired me, educated me, and entertained me. I hope they do the same for you as you work to put a solid “!” on the year.

Read More >

3 RESILIENCY TIPS FROM THE 'ORACLE OF OMAHA'

3 RESILIENCY TIPS FROM THE 'ORACLE OF OMAHA'

Of the top 10 companies in the Fortune 500, only one was built from scratch by the individual still leading that company today. The company is Berkshire Hathaway, and the individual is the legendary investor Warren Buffett. I've long been fascinated by the 'Oracle of Omaha,' and in this blog I share three essential lessons gleaned from a recent documentary on Buffett -- as well as a few nuggets from his well-circulated annual letter to shareholders.

Read More >

HITTING THE WALL? THREE TIPS FOR MAKING IT OVER

HITTING THE WALL? THREE TIPS FOR MAKING IT OVER

Earlier this year I planned on writing a blog about hitting the wall, sharing three techniques that helped me get over my wall. After reading a recent New York Times article, I was moved to GSD with that blog. Whether you're hitting the wall -- or simply facing a situation that's impacting your ability to GSD -- I hope you'll find this helpful in getting back on track. 

Read More >

DISCOVERING THE UNEXPECTED, 7,000 MILES FROM HOME

DISCOVERING THE UNEXPECTED, 7,000 MILES FROM HOME

Last month I traveled to Thailand, spending a week building a home via Habitat for Humanity, a new volunteer experience for me. “How was it?” clients and friends are asking. “How did it compare to what you expected?” I answer both questions - and more - in this blog.

Read More >